Williams College

Williams College

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Williams College

Williams College

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Williams College is a private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. It was established in 1793 with funds from the estate of Ephraim Williams. Originally a men's college, Williams became co-educational in 1970. Fraternities were also phased out during this period, beginning in 1962.

Williams forms part of the historic Little Three colleges, along with Wesleyan University and rival Amherst College. There are three academic curricular divisions (humanities, sciences and social sciences), 24 departments, 33 majors, and two master's degree programs in art history and development economics. There are 315 voting faculty members, with a student-to-faculty ratio of 7:1.

As of 2009, the school has an enrollment of 2,124 undergraduate students and 49 graduate students. The academic year follows a 4–1–4 schedule of two four-course semesters plus a one-course "winter study" term in January. A summer research schedule involves about 200 students on campus completing projects with professors.

In 2010, 2011, and 2012, Forbes magazine ranked Williams College as the best undergraduate institution in the United States, ahead of every Ivy League university and national liberal arts college, including Harvard University, Yale University, Princeton University, Dartmouth College, Amherst College, and Swarthmore College.

In its 2013 edition, U.S. News & World Report ranked Williams as the single best liberal arts college in the country.

Honors: A Top Liberal Arts College

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Media contact:  Noelle Lemoine, communications assistant; tele: (413) 597-4277; email:Noelle.Lemoine@williams.edu

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass., February 7, 2011 -- Gabriela Hernandez '11 and Oscar Moreno '11 are among the 25 students selected nationally to receive Woodrow Wilson-Rockefeller Brothers Fund Fellowships for Aspiring Teachers of Color (WW-RBF).

"I was delighted to have two winners this year," said Molly Magavern, the Williams College liaison to the WW-RBF fellowship. "Both Oscar and Gaby have shown an unusual commitment to public education and are already quite experienced in the classroom. Oscar attended inner city schools himself and is passionate about serving as a role model for youth from backgrounds like his.  Gaby knows from personal experience what a difference good teachers and good schools can make, and she wants to make that difference for her future students."

The fellowship awards to each of its recipients a $30,000 stipend to complete a master’s degree in education, as well as preparation to teach in a high-need public school, support throughout a three-year teaching commitment, and guidance toward teaching certification. The 25 recipients were nominated by one of the college and  university partners and chosen through a competitive selection process.

Hernandez, an art history major with a concentration in Africana studies, grew up in San Francisco, Calif., and attended San Francisco University High School.

Upon hearing that Hernandez won the fellowship, Holly Edwards, senior lecturer in art said, "I envy her future students! As a student, [Gabriela] was engaged, smart, and so receptive – a great teacher in the making."

Hernandez said her interest in education began during her time as a Spanish teacher at Breakthrough Collaborative, a national non-profit that recruits high school and college students to teach middle school students. She also spent time working at Breakthrough Collaborative's national offices in the development department.

"This past summer, as I was doing two internships -- one in education and one in the arts -- I realized that I found working with kids more fulfilling," Hernandez said. "I have been very fortunate to get the education I have received, and I want to give back to the community by giving students, especially underprivileged students, the support and opportunities they deserve."

Moreno, a native of Huntington Park, Calif., attended Lynwood High School. He is an American studies major with a specialization in race, ethnicity, and diaspora. He is also completing two concentrations in Africana studies and Latino studies.

"Having had Oscar in several courses during his time at Williams, I will always remember his kindness, intelligence, and his sincere enthusiasm for American and ethnic studies," said Maria Elena Cepeda, associate professor of Latino/a studies. "The news about the fellowship is thrilling, as Oscar certainly possesses the potential to become a noteworthy educator and mentor. He will make a positive difference in many students' lives."

Working with elementary school students in Williamstown, Moreno discovered the importance of interdisciplinary teaching, using models and lectures to keep students engaged. 

"I found a passion for teaching," Moreno said. "I feel revitalized by students' reactions when they get a concept and can articulate their own thoughts and perceptions. I want be part of the important role teachers play in the lives of teenagers; you help shape the future through the work you do with your students."

Established in 1992 by the Rockefeller Brothers Fund (RBF), the Fellowships for Aspiring Teachers of Color were created to help recruit, support, and retain individuals of color as public education teachers and administrators. Since its inception, the program has awarded nearly $8  million in grants and financial assistance to375 families. In January 2009, RBF transferred the program to the Woodrow Wilson Foundation.

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Founded in 1793, Williams College is the second-oldest institution of higher learning in Massachusetts. The college’s 2,000 students are taught by a faculty noted for the quality of their teaching and research, and the achievement of academic goals includes active participation of students with faculty in their research. Students' educational experience is enriched by the residential campus environment in Williamstown, Mass., which provides a host of opportunities for interaction with one another and with faculty beyond the classroom. Admission decisions are made regardless of a student’s financial ability, and the college provides grants and other assistance to meet the demonstrated needs of all who are admitted.

To visit the college on the Internet: http://www.williams.edu/ Williams College can also be found on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/williamscollege and Twitter: http://twitter.com/williamscollege

February 7, 2011

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass., Feb. 1, 2011 -- The annual Faculty Lecture Series will begin on Thursday, Feb. 10, with a talk by Gretchen Long, associate professor of history at Williams College, titled "'He's Got No License, Nor No Deplomer': A Black Doctor and His Story After the Civil War." The lecture will take place at 4 p.m. in Wege Auditorium, with a reception to follow in Schow atrium. The event is free and open to the public.

How and why did white authorities regulate African American medical practice? Did newly-free black people prefer black doctors to white doctors? What was freedom like for black people who were not agricultural laborers or domestic servants? Using a collection of letters from National Archives that chronicle the story of an African American man from Austin, Texas, who considered himself to be a doctor, Long explores conflicts involving medical practice, black communities, and government authority. The questions and their answers reveal new aspects of Emancipation and American medical history.

After arriving at Williams in 2003, Long received tenure in 2009. Her research centers on African American and American history, particularly American women's history, American medical history, African American literature, and Emancipation. She has taught courses including The Age of Washington and DuBois, Fictions of African American History, African American History 1619-1865, and African American History 1865 to Present.

Last semester, Long was awarded a fellowship for research from Williams' Oakley Center for  the Humanities and Social Sciences, allowing her to study "Black Children in the American Imagination." Previously, she was a research fellow at Harvard's W.E.B. DuBois Institute for African and African American Studies.

During her fellowship at Harvard, Long worked on a book manuscript titled "Doctoring Freedom: The Politics of African American Medical Care," which is currently under review with the University of North Carolina Press. She has also had book reviews published in the "Journal of American History" and the "Journal of Southern History."

Long received her B.A. from Wesleyan in 1989 and her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 2003.

The year's lecture series continues with five additional lectures, which will take place on the next five consecutive Thursdays. Each will take place in Wege at 4 p.m.

The next speaker, Associate Professor of Chinese Christopher Nugent, will speak on "A Medieval Chinese Poem in Its Material Contexts. The other speakers include Stephen Freund, Claire Ting, Brian Martin, and Olga Shevchenko.

END

For building locations on the Williams campus, please consult the map outside the driveway entrance to the Security Office located in Hopkins Hall on Main Street (Rte. 2), next to the Thompson Memorial Chapel, or call the Office of Public Affairs (413) 597-4277. The map can also be found on the web at www.williams.edu/home/campusmap/

To visit the college on the Internet: http://www.williams.edu/ Williams College can also be found on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/williamscollege and Twitter: http://twitter.com/williamscollege

February 1, 2011

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass., Feb. 1, 2011 -- On Tuesday, Feb. 8, Ngonidzashe Munemo, assistant professor of political science, will give a talk at Williams College titled, “From Neo-Colonialism to Neo-Patrimonialism: Reflections on 50 Years of Independence in Africa.”  The lecture will be at 4 p.m. in Griffin Hall, room 3, and is free and open to the public.

Munemo’s research and teaching are in comparative politics, with a focus on Africa. He is currently working on a book manuscript on the political determinants of government responses to threats of famine in Sub-Saharan Africa and starting a new project on the effects of institutional choice and processes of adoption on the stability of leadership changes in post-independence Africa. He received his B.A. from Bard College after transferring from the University of Zimbabwe and his Ph.D. from Columbia University.

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For building locations on the Williams campus, please consult the map outside the driveway entrance to the Security Office located in Hopkins Hall on Main Street (Rte. 2), next to the Thompson Memorial Chapel, or call the Office of Public Affairs (413) 597-4277. The map can also be found on the web at www.williams.edu/home/campusmap/

To visit the college on the Internet: http://www.williams.edu/ Williams College can also be found on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/williamscollege and Twitter: http://twitter.com/williamscollege

February 1, 2011

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass., Jan. 28, 2011 -- Over five consecutive Mondays, from Feb. 7 to March 7, the Williams College Department of Romance Languages will screen five recent films from France as part of the series "Secrecy and Scandal: Clandestine Lives and Passions in New French Film." Each screening will take place at 7 p.m. at Images Cinema on Spring Street. The screenings are free and open to the public.

The "Secrecy and Scandal: Clandestine Lives and Passions in New French Film" series presents films that explore the role of secrecy and scandal in the lives of women and men in contemporary France, from scandalous passions and romance, to secret talents, motives, and ambitions. Professor Brian Martin from the Williams College Department of Romance Languages, co-organizer of the festival, will introduce each film.  

The series begins on Monday, Feb. 7 with Olivier Assayas’s L’Heure d’été (Summer Hours). This film examines a bourgeois family trying to negotiate the past, present, and future in contemporary France. Assembled for the birthday of their widowed mother, Hélène and three siblings celebrate what will be their last family gathering in the Île-de-France. An impeccably observed family study, Summer Hours is also a film about the eroding of a nation’s heritage by the demands of a globalized economy.

The following Monday, Feb. 14, Images will show Martin Provost’s Séraphine (Séraphine), featuring Brussels-born actress Yolande Moreau. The story is about a simple housekeeper who, in 1905 at the age of 41, begins painting brilliantly vivid landscapes in a naïve style with a passion that borders on artistic genius and madness.

On Monday, Feb. 21, Ursula Meier’s Home (Home) will be shown. The film investigates the thin line between sanity and madness, and the moments when family closeness becomes claustrophobia. What begins as a study of idiosyncratic domesticity seamlessly shifts into a portrait of psychological horror, and a cautionary tale about environmental disaster.

Feb. 28 will feature André Téchiné’s La Fille du RER (The Girl on the Train). Examining racism and intolerance in contemporary France, this film was inspired by true events of 2004, when a young woman falsely claimed to be the victim of an anti-Semitic attack on a Paris train by six youth of North and West African descent.

The last film of the series, Abdellatif Kechiche’s La Graine et le mulet (The Secret of the Grain), will be shown on Monday, March 7. The story takes place in southern France, where elderly dockworker Slimane decides to turn an old boat into a floating restaurant. The increasingly ailing Slimane will need all of his family's help to accomplish this ambitious project.

All films are in French with English subtitles. These film descriptions were adapted from those found at: http://www.facecouncil.org/tournees/index.html

The "Secrecy and Scandal: Clandestine Lives and Passions in New French Film" is a collaboration with the Tournées Festival of the French-American Cultural Exchange Council, which was made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy and 
the French Ministry of Culture (CNC), as well as the Florence Gould Foundation, the Grand Marnier Foundation, and Highbrow Entertainment. Presented by the Williams College Department of Romance Languages and cosponsored by the Williams College Center for Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.

Images Cinema is located at 50 Spring Street in Williamstown, Mass. For more information on each of these films, visit www.imagescinema.org/events

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For building locations on the Williams campus, please consult the map outside the driveway entrance to the Security Office located in Hopkins Hall on Main Street (Rte. 2), next to the Thompson Memorial Chapel, or call the Office of Public Affairs (413) 597-4277. The map can also be found on the web at www.williams.edu/home/campusmap/

To visit the college on the Internet: www.williams.edu/ Williams College can also be found on Facebook:http://www.facebook.com/williamscollege and Twitter: http://twitter.com/williamscollege

January 28, 2011

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass., Jan. 26, 2011 -- Williams President Adam Falk announced today that Lisa Corrin, Class of 1956 Director of the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA), has decided to leave her position on June 30 to teach at the college and serve both as a Clark Fellow at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute and as a Visiting Scholar in Museum Studies at New York University.

The college will begin a national search for her successor.

“In Lisa’s six years as director, the museum has made remarkable changes,” Falk said in an e-mail sent to campus. “With her able and dedicated staff, she’s carried out a thoughtful plan to refocus museum activities on the college’s teaching mission, which includes, among many other initiatives, the first reinstallation of the collection in many years.

“Exhibitions developed under her leadership have gained international recognition for creatively prodding, educating, and challenging viewers. At the same time, she has entrepreneurially drawn new resources to the museum from foundations and other supporters.”

The museum has presented over 75 exhibitions since Corrin arrived, several of which have traveled nationally and internationally. Exhibitions that took place under her directorship emphasized cross-disciplinary approaches to, and new ways of looking at, art. Among these exhibitions are Jackson Pollock at Williams College: A Tribute to Kirk Varnedoe '67 (2006); Making It New: The Art and Style of Sarah and Gerald Murphy (2007); Beyond the Familiar: Photography and the Construction of Community (2008); Prendergast in Italy (2009); Drowned in a Glass of Water: An Installation by Pepón Osorio (2010); and the current reinstallation of WCMA's permanent collection in ten galleries, Reflections on a Museum (2011).

Corrin has also been overseeing the acquisition of two major public artworks that will be installed this spring at Williams, including a commissioned sculpture by artist Jenny Holzer to be sited in the science quad.

Corrin encouraged collaborations between WCMA and many academic departments on campus to connect with the college and to enrich the context in which art is seen.

Most notable have been Landscapes of the Mind: Contemporary Artists Contemplate the Brain (2010), a collaboration with Betty Zimmerberg, Chair and Professor of Psychology, and The Place of Taste: A Symposium on Food, Culture, and Community, which celebrated the 10th anniversary of Gastronomica: The Journal of Food and Culture, a collaboration with Darra Goldstein, Francis Christopher Oakley Third Century Professor of Russian. To strengthen WCMA's relationship with regional institutions, she worked with MASS MoCA and the Yale University Art Gallery on Sol LeWitt: A Wall Drawing Retrospective, with the Williamstown Art Conservation Center on Jackson Pollock at Williams College, and with DownStreet Art and the Northern Berkshire Community Coalition on Drowned in a Glass of Water, among others.

"Lisa's passion for visionary programming helped maintain a 'buzz' at WCMA, while her insistence on rigorous scholarship steered the museum toward recognition and awards for curatorial excellence," said George Ahl, chair of WCMA's visiting committee, the advisory board of the museum.

Under her directorship, WCMA has received funding from major granting institutions, including the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Corrin has overseen the development of the Fulkerson Fund for Leadership in the Arts, which builds upon Williams’ preeminent role in educating the next generation of leaders in arts professions, and the Mellon Curatorial Fellow for Diversity in the Arts, which encourages greater diversity in the museum field. She has also championed efforts to digitize WCMA's collection and make it available online for all audiences.

“It’s been an enormous privilege and joy to lead one of the great college art museums,” Corrin said. “Working with our talented students, faculty, alumni, museum staff, our dedicated Visiting Committee, and neighboring arts institutions has been hugely inspiring. I look forward to what lies ahead, but I know that the friends and colleagues who have been part of my Williams experience will always remain part of my life."

Among the local museum leaders with whom she has worked is MASS MoCA Director Joe Thompson, who said, “While I'm excited for Lisa and look forward to watching her future projects unfold, we'll miss her in her role at WCMA. As a programming partner in Kidspace and the Sol LeWitt retrospective, she brought great energy and rock solid commitment. The roster of exhibitions that she and her colleagues produced at WCMA brought thousands of visitors to our doorstep, and critical accolades to our region, and as a board member of MASS MoCA, her contacts and many years of curatorial experience are highly valued.”

Said Clark Director and former president of the American Association of Museum Directors Michael Conforti, “Lisa is so energetic and full of ideas. I can think of few of my colleagues with such a subtle understanding and deep commitment to art, artists, and art institutions. I really hope to be able to work with her on projects in the future."

Both globalizing WCMA's collection and teaching were important parts of her time at Williams. She added significant works of art to the collection, from old masters to contemporary photography from Brazil, South Africa, and China. She also mentored students and encouraged them to fully participate in the robust exhibition program.

Before coming to Williams, Corrin was deputy director and the Jon and Mary Shirley Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Seattle Art Museum, where, among other projects, she curated the Olympic Sculpture Park. She earlier served as chief curator at the Serpentine Gallery in London, and before that in the same role at the Contemporary Museum in Baltimore, where she was also a founding assistant director. She has also taught in the Graduate Program in Art History at the University of Washington.

Corrin earned her B.A. at Mary Washington College and studied at University College, London. She did her graduate work at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and Johns Hopkins University.

Falk concluded his announcement by saying, “We thank Lisa for enlivening our cultural and intellectual lives in so many ways and look forward to her continuing contributions, both here and in the broader world.”

Photo credit: Elizabeth Leitzell 2010

END

Founded in 1793, Williams College is the second oldest institution of higher learning in Massachusetts. The college’s 2,000 students are taught by a faculty noted for the quality of their teaching and research, and the achievement of academic goals includes active participation of students with faculty in their research. Students' educational experience is enriched by the residential campus environment in Williamstown, Mass., which provides a host of opportunities for interaction with one another and with faculty beyond the classroom. Admission decisions are made regardless of a student’s financial ability, and the college provides grants and other assistance to meet the demonstrated needs of all who are admitted.

To visit the college on the Internet:www.williams.edu

January 26, 2011

The Williams community will gather on Feb. 3 to express and affirm campus narratives and values in a series of events comprising the third annual Claiming Williams Day. The day’s events include several discussions, films, a performance, and a bonfire.

Claiming Williams seeks to invigorate the discourse on unexamined norms at Williams. This year, the theme for the day is “Our stories, our community, our responsibilities.” The program, organized by a steering committee of students, staff, and faculty, will feature dialogue rather than just lecture, with discussions exploring a spectrum of topics from ideological diversity to nontraditional students.

“Emphasizing personal experiences keeps Claiming Williams Day focused on the community of Williams itself,” said steering committee member Johannes Wilson. “Lectures allow one person to speak, but discussions allow many people to speak to each other.”

The day’s events begin at 9 a.m. on the MainStage at the ’62 Center for Theatre and Dance with a panel of current faculty and staff who graduated from Williams between 1958 and 2006. They will share their Williams experiences from different vantage points, past and present. President Adam Falk will deliver opening remarks.

The exploration of Williams history through personal stories will continue later in the afternoon at a community forum titled “Perspectives from the Front Lines of Change at Williams,” in Griffin 3 at 1:45 p.m. This forum will feature alumni and former Williams faculty and administrators who witnessed key moments in the college’s history, including the abolishment of fraternities in the early 1960s, the move to co-education in the 1970s, and the Stand With Us movement in 2008.

Two events will build on recent campus discussions about the role of athletics at Williams. The first, at 11 a.m. in Goodrich Hall, is a community forum titled “Yard by Yard: Creating an Identity at Williams,” in which students will discuss how their campus experiences have been shaped by their roles as athletes or non-athletes. The second, a screening of Dave Zirin’s 2010 documentary, “Not Just a Game: Power, Politics, and American Sports,” will be held at 3:45 p.m. on the ’62 Center MainStage.  A conversation with associate producer Diane Williams ’02 will follow.

The emphasis on discussion will extend to the fine arts in “The Art of Dialogue at the Museum,” a discussion at 1:45 p.m. in the Rose Study Gallery of the Williams College Museum of Art. This facilitated conversation will integrate academic and personal reflections on artwork by Kara Walker, Glenn Ligon, and Pepon Osorio that grapples with class, race, gender, and privilege. 

Other events of the day include a screening of Lee Mun Wah’s 1995 film, “The Color of Fear,” at 1:45 p.m. on the ’62 Center MainStage. This landmark documentary centers on raw conversations about both white racism and inter-minority racism. Educator and activist Victor Lewis will join the screening. Also at 1:45 p.m., in Brooks-Rogers Recital Hall, Allan Johnson, author of Privilege, Power, and Difference (Mc Graw-Hill, 2005), will present an analytic framework for discussing privilege in a way that does not create guilt in its beneficiaries. Both Lewis and Johnson will also lead smaller discussions at 3:45 p.m. 

Then, at 8 p.m. on the ’62 Center MainStage, the Williams community is invited to attend Herstory, a spoken-word poetry performance combining comedy, rhythm, and chorus that tells the stories of four women who grew up in the United States. The day will close with a bonfire at 10 p.m. hosted by the Williams Outing Club.

“Claiming Williams is a good time for people to share their experiences and how they think that could help others here,” Wilson said. “People tell these stories because they think change can happen, and it is important to use this knowledge to change Williams for the better. We all live together, so we have to take into consideration how our stories affect others’ stories and how everything we do affects one another.”

All members of the Williams community are encouraged to attend the day’s events. For a complete schedule and event descriptions, please visit http://claiming.williams.edu/claiming-williams-2011/2011-schedule/

January 25, 2011

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass., January 19, 2011 -- During February and March, Williams College will sponsor the annual Faculty Lecture Series. The special aim of this series is to present big ideas that cross disciplinary boundaries. The six lectures in the series will take place on Feb. 10, 17, and 24 and March 3, 10, and 17. All lectures will take place at 4 p.m. in Wege Auditorium, with receptions to follow in Schow atrium. The lectures are free and open to the public.

On Feb. 10, Gretchen Long, associate professor of history, will deliver the opening lecture of the series. Her talk is titled "'He's Got No License, Nor No Deplomer': A Black Doctor and His Story After the Civil War."

The second lecture, scheduled for Feb. 17, is titled "A Medieval Chinese Poem in Its Material Contexts." Associate Professor of Chinese Christopher Nugent will deliver the lecture.

Stephen Freund, associate professor of computer science, will present a talk on Feb. 24 titled "Stopping the Software Bug Epidemic."

On March 3, Claire Ting, associate professor of biology, will present a lecture titled "Minimal Genomes, Maximal Productivity: Microbial Strategies for Dominating the High Seas."

Brian Martin, associate professor of French, will give the lecture on March 10. It is titled "Gays in the French Military: From Napoleon to the First World War."

The final lecture will take place on March 17. Olga Shevchenko, associate professor of sociology, will give a talk titled "Crisis as a Way of Life: Culture of the Everyday in Today's Russia."

The Faculty Lecture Series was founded in 1911 by the wife of a faculty member who hoped to "relieve the tedium of long New England winters with an opportunity to hear Williams professors talk about issues that really mattered to them."

END

Founded in 1793, Williams College is the second-oldest institution of higher learning in Massachusetts. The college’s 2,000 students are taught by a faculty noted for the quality of their teaching and research, and the achievement of academic goals includes active participation of students with faculty in their research. Students' educational experience is enriched by the residential campus environment in Williamstown, Mass., which provides a host of opportunities for interaction with one another and with faculty beyond the classroom. Admission decisions are made regardless of a student’s financial ability, and the college provides grants and other assistance to meet the demonstrated needs of all who are admitted.

To visit the college on the Internet: http://www.williams.edu/ Williams College can also be found on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/williamscollege and Twitter: http://twitter.com/williamscollege

January 19, 2011

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass., January 14, 2011 -- On the recommendation of the Committee on Appointments and Promotions, the Williams College Board of Trustees has promoted seven faculty to the position of associate professor with tenure, effective July 1, 2011. They are Edan Dekel, classics; Sarah Goh, chemistry; Sarah Hammerschlag, religion; Gage McWeeny, English; Bernard Rhie, English; Mihai Stoiciu, mathematics; and Tara Watson, economics.

Edan Dekel

Dekel is interested in Greek and Roman poetry, comparative epic, Biblical studies, ancient Judaism, and medieval literature. His book, “Virgil’s Homeric Lens,” which reassesses the relationship of the “Aeneid” to the “Iliad” and the “Odyssey,” is forthcoming from Routledge in June.

At Williams since 2005, Dekel has taught advanced Greek and Latin courses, as well as Jewish studies and classics courses in translation, including “Ancient Wisdom Literature” and “From Adam to Noah: Literary Imagination and the Primeval History In Genesis.” He held a fellowship from the Oakley Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences in 2008-09 and an Andrew W. Mellon fellowship in Humanistic Studies in 1996-97. He received his B.A. from Brown University and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.

Sarah Goh

Goh investigates non-covalent assemblies based on biological systems through a variety of organic chemistry processes. She has held a three-year grant from the National Science Foundation Research in Undergraduate Institutions for a project titled “Self-Assembled PEG-Peptide Copolymers for Biomedical Applications.”

Goh’s work has been published in several scholarly publications, including “Biomacromolecules” and “Journal of Polymer Science, Polymer Chemistry.” She teaches introductory- and intermediate-level organic chemistry, as well as an advanced course on physical organic chemistry. She received her B.S. from the University of Michigan, her M.S. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.

Sarah Hammerschlag

Hammerschlag’s research fields include modern Jewish thought, Continental philosophy, literary theory and critical theory, and European intellectual history. Her book, “The Figural Jew: Politics and Identity in Postwar French Thought” was published by the University of Chicago Press last year. She received a fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies to work on her second book, “Sowers and Sages: The Renaissance of Judaism in Postwar Paris.”

Among the courses she has taught since joining Williams in 2005 are “Judaism: Innovation and Tradition,” “Endtimes: Messianism in Modernity,” and “The Turn to Religion in Postmodern Thought.” She received her B.A. from Wesleyan University, an M.A. from Hollins College, and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.

Gage McWeeny

McWeeny’s research and teaching centers on Victorian literature and culture.  His book “The Comfort of Strangers: Social Intimacy and Victorian Literature,” for which he held an Oakley Center fellowship in 2008-09, is forthcoming from Oxford University Press in 2011.  He is also interested in twentieth century fiction and contemporary experimental writing.

He is the co-editor of a Longman Edition of Charles Dickens’ “Hard Times” (2003), as well as the author of recent articles that have appeared in “NOVEL: A Forum on Fiction” and “Victorian Poetry.” He has written for the arts journal “Cabinet” and is also a contributor to programs on BBC Radio 3 and 4.  Recent courses he has taught at Williams include “The Nineteenth-Century British Novel” and “Borrowing and Stealing: Originality in Literature and Culture.” He received his B.A. from Columbia University and his Ph.D. from Princeton University.

Bernie Rhie

Rhie is interested in the connections between philosophy and literature, with an emphasis on 20th-century literature and ordinary language philosophy. His current book project, “The Philosophy of the Face: Theorizing the Face in the 20th Century,” explores the philosophical significance of faces, face perception, and physiognomy for a number of key 20th-century thinkers, including Levinas, Wittgenstein, and Deleuze.

In addition, Rhie is co-editor of a collection of critical essays titled “Stanley Cavell and Literary Studies: Consequences of Skepticism,” which is forthcoming from Continuum. Courses he has taught at Williams include “The Problem of Modernity and the Modernist Imagination,”
“The Ethics of Fiction,” “Introduction to the Novel,” and a course on J.M. Coetzee. He received his B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, and his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.

Mihai Stoiciu

Stoiciu conducts research on orthogonal polynomials on the unit circle, on random matrices, and on the spectral properties of random operators. His work has been published in “Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society,” “Journal of Approximation Theory,” and “Duke Mathematical Journal.”

Stoiciu has held visiting academic appointments at the Isaac Newton Institute of Mathematical Science in Cambridge, England, in 2008, and at the University of California, Irvine, in 2008-09. At Williams, he teaches courses on linear algebra, functional analysis, complex analysis, numerical analysis, calculus, and probability. He received his B.S. from the University of Bucharest and his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology

Tara Watson

Watson specializes in labor economics, public finance, health economics, urban economics, and economic demography. Currently, her ongoing projects examine barriers to Medicaid participation among immigrants, and school choice and segregation.

She has been published in “Public Finance Review,” “Journal of Human Resources,” “Review of Income and Wealth,” “Journal of Health Economics,” among others. Her work on income segregation as well as minimum age drinking laws and pregnancy complications has been covered in mainstream media. At Williams, she teaches on public finance, poverty, health disparities, and econometrics. She received her B.A. from Wesleyan University and her Ph.D. from Harvard University.

END

Founded in 1793, Williams College is the second-oldest institution of higher learning in Massachusetts. The college’s 2,000 students are taught by a faculty noted for the quality of their teaching and research, and the achievement of academic goals includes active participation of students with faculty in their research. Students’ educational experience is enriched by the residential campus environment in Williamstown, Mass., which provides a host of opportunities for interaction with one another and with faculty beyond the classroom. Admission decisions are made regardless of a student’s financial ability, and the college provides grants and other assistance to meet the demonstrated needs of all who are admitted.

To visit the college on the Internet:www.williams.edu

January 14, 2011

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass., January 5, 2011 – Williams College will host a presentation titled “Getting Biomass Right: Should We Be Generating Electricity from Trees?” on Thursday, Feb. 10, at 7:30 p.m. in the auditorium on the lower level of Paresky Student Center. The event, free and open to the public, is the second in a series of forums addressing issues of biomass.

The discussion will feature Bill Moomaw, director of the Center for International Environment and Resource Policy at the Fletcher School of Tufts University, and Mary Booth, co-founder of the Massachusetts Environmental Energy Alliance (MEEA). Each will present remarks before taking questions.

Moomaw is professor of international environmental policy at Tufts. His work and research over the past two decades have focused on stratospheric ozone, climate, energy, forests, water, and sustainable development. He has served as a lead author or coordinating lead author for four Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports and is coordinating lead author of the IPCC special report “Renewable Energy and Climate Change” due out this year. He was also a member of the Technical Steering Committee that published new forest management recommendations based on ecosystem services for Massachusetts. He has advised corporations, governments, and the World Bank on climate, energy, and forest issues. He graduated from Williams in 1959, earned his Ph.D. at M.I.T., and taught in the Williams chemistry department from 1964 to 1990.

Booth is a scientist whose research has examined human influences on soils, waters, and forests. She is currently serving as an expert witness on air-permit appeals for biomass plants proposed nationally. The MEEA, which she co-founded with Alexandra Dawson, advocates for sustainable energy solutions by carrying out scientific and legal analyses of the impacts of energy policies. The organization promotes issues such as energy conservation and efficiency and transparent, science-based state and federal energy policies, and opposes large-scale biomass plants. Booth was formerly a senior scientist at Environmental Working Group. She received her Ph.D. in ecosystem ecology at Utah State University.

The event is sponsored by the Center for Environmental Studies, the Zilkha Center for Environmental Initiatives, and the Office of Public Affairs.

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For building locations on the Williams campus, please consult the map outside the driveway entrance to the Security Office located in Hopkins Hall on Main Street (Rte. 2), next to the Thompson Memorial Chapel, or call the Office of Public Affairs (413) 597-4277. The map can also be found on the web at www.williams.edu/home/campusmap/

To visit the college on the Internet: http://www.williams.edu/ Williams College can also be found on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/williamscollege and Twitter: http://twitter.com/williamscollege

January 5, 2011

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass., December 21, 2010 -- Williams College has announced that six members of the Class of 2011 have been awarded prestigious fellowships for graduate study in England. This year's recipients of the Dr. Herchel Smith Fellowship for graduate study at Emmanuel College, Cambridge University, are Antoniya Aleksandrova, Marissa Kimsey, Zebulon Levine, Charles Rousseau, and Jehanne Wyllie. Yue-Yi Hwa was awarded the Donovan-Moody Fellowship for graduate study at Oxford University. The applicants were selected from a pool of 28 students.

Aleksandrova, a physics and math major from Varna, Bulgaria, plans to study for a Ph.D. in applied mathematics and theoretical physics. She is currently writing a thesis in the area of quantum information. A member of Phi Beta Kappa, she has conducted research over two summers with faculty members of the physics department. She has spent time at Williams tutoring fellow students in writing and physics. She is also a member of the college’s badminton club and Outing Club.

Kimsey is an economics and women’s and gender studies double major from Highland Park, Ill. She plans to pursue an M.Phil. in development studies as well as a degree in economics. Also a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Kimsey’s senior thesis project is a computable general equilibrium analysis of social grants in South Africa. Kimsey has been awarded numerous grants, allowing her to conduct research on social grants from a gender perspective in South Africa, Mozambique, Bolivia and Brazil.

Levine, a resident of South Burlington, Vt., will pursue a research-based M.Phil. in chemistry, working in organic synthesis. He is a chemistry major with a concentration in biochemistry/molecular biology. Levine is a 1960s Scholar in the chemistry department as well as one of the chairs of the chemistry student advisory council. He is also a member of the varsity wrestling team and a rock climbing instructor and monitor at the college’s climbing wall.

Rousseau, a native of Richmond, Va., is an English and religion double major. At Cambridge, he plans to work toward a Diploma in Theology in his first year and toward a Ph.D. in culture and criticism in his second. Currently, he is writing an English thesis about the relationship between apocalypticism and literature. A tour guide and member of the Springstreeters, Rousseau has also been the student director for the Writing Workshop and founded and led groups on campus seeking to create forums for discussion of religion, belief, and personal questions.

Wyllie, a double major in English and American studies, is a native of the U.S. Virgin Islands who currently lives in Miami, Fla. She will pursue an M.Phil. in social anthropology and course work in English studies. At Williams, Wyllie is a member of the Claiming Williams Steering Committee and a 1960s Scholar in the English department. She spent a summer working with the Chinese-American Planning Council in New York City as a community organizer to galvanize political and financial support for workforce development and youth programming. She also served in the AmeriCorps during a gap year following her sophomore year.

Hwa, an Arabic studies and political economy major from Penang, Malaysia, will pursue an M.Phil. in politics at Oxford. She was awarded fellowships for summer research on language an education policy in Malaysia. She has interned at the Socioeconomic and Environmental Research Institute in Malaysia, writing a paper on labor statistics and policy which was published in a volume of conference proceedings. At Williams, Hwa has served as editor-in-chief of the “Williams Record,” as well as founder and editor-in-chief of “Telos,” a journal of Christian discourse. She is a member of Williams Christian Fellowship and a peer tutor in the economics department.

The Dr. Herchel Smith Fellowships were established in 1979 by Dr. Herchel Smith to enable Williams graduates to study at Emmanuel College, Cambridge University, for two years after graduation. Selection is based on general intellectual ability and attainment in the student’s major field of study, as well as the promise of original and creative work and character. Other criteria include leadership, scholarly attainment, and physical vigor.

The Dorothy H. Donovan Memorial Fellowship was established in 1978 by Hedley T. Donovan in memory of his wife to support Williams graduates at Oxford. The John Edmund Moody 1921 Fellowship was established in 1927 by Mr. John Moody in memory of his son to support graduate study at Oxford University during the two years following graduation.  Selection criteria include general intellectual ability as shown in the major field of study, with special attention to character, need of assistance, and promise of original and creative work.

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Founded in 1793, Williams College is the second-oldest institution of higher learning in Massachusetts. The college’s 2,000 students are taught by a faculty noted for the quality of their teaching and research, and the achievement of academic goals includes active participation of students with faculty in their research. Students' educational experience is enriched by the residential campus environment in Williamstown, Mass., which provides a host of opportunities for interaction with one another and with faculty beyond the classroom. Admission decisions are made regardless of a student’s financial ability, and the college provides grants and other assistance to meet the demonstrated needs of all who are admitted.

To visit the college on the Internet: www.williams.edu/ Williams College can also be found on Facebook: www.facebook.com/williamscollege and Twitter: http://twitter.com/williamscollege

December 21, 2010